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Education Week's Photo Blog

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    VIENNA, VA - JULY 10
Chrissy Shackelford, members of Story Pirates, punches the air during a performance at Children's Theatre-in-the-Woods at Wolf Trap National Park in Vienna, Virginia Friday July 10, 2015. Story Pirates is an organization based in New York and Los Angeles that pairs teachers with comedians and actors to make learning engaging.  (Photo by Jared Soares for Education Week)Maggie DeBlasis writes about the art of storytelling and the nonprofit performance group Story Pirates.

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    Preston Castle in Ione on Thursday, June 11, 2015. Preston Castle was a reform school for delinquent youth called the Preston School of Industry from 1894 until 1960. The castle closed in 1960, but new facilities for the school on the grounds remained in service for several years after that. The Preston Castle Foundation offers tours of the building.Randall Benton, a staff photographer with The Sacramento Bee newspaper, shares his thoughts on photographing the Preston School of Industry in Ione, California.

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    FoodCorps member and gardening/home economics teacher Tyrone Thompson, left, helps eighth grader Kristopher Cody plant lettuce in a greenhouse at the STAR School outside of Flagstaff, Ariz. on August 28, 2015. Many of the K-8 charter school's students are from the nearby Navajo Nation and the curriculum is set up to reflect traditional values, of which farming and food sovereignty are among the most important. Local farmers spend time  teaching children how to grow an organic garden in the  greenhouses at the school and students go on field trips to local farms to learn how to grow crops.Nick Cote describes his experiences photographing a school on the Navajo Nation in Northern Arizona that integrates cultural experiences with students' academic studies to build the necessary skills, and motivation to attend college.

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    In this Sept. 5, 2015, photo, Dayden Rafferty (99) second from right, helps an injured Ryan Bergstrom, (46) as players walk off the field after their first varsity game in Alexander, N.D. An oil boom in what's known as the Bakken region has increased the population in and around the tiny town, bringing in enough players for the school to have its own football program for the first time in nearly 30 years. Rafferty is the fourth generation of his family to play football for the Comets. (AP Photo/Martha Irvine)Oil boom enables high school football to return to small North Dakota town after a 27-year absence.

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    In this photo taken Dec, 17, 2014, Kassidy Suarez, 22, is hugged by her mother, Maria Alguilar, after legally changing her name at family court in Miami. Suarez has come a long way since being rejected by her family, dropping out of high school, being homeless, abusing drugs and doing survival sex work. She is now focused on getting her GED. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)Many young transgender people, wrestling with their identities, find themselves shunned by family, friends and co-workers. "A lot of people really don't realize the like immense amount of pain the average trans person goes through just trying to like live their life," says Eli, a 17-year-old male who was born a girl and lives in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Eli and other young transgender people in South Florida illustrate the hardship this community faces. They also show its resilience. Here are their stories, as told to Associated Press photographer Lynne Sladky.

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    A space heater is surrounded by kickball marks in the coal dust on the gymnasium wall at Ansted Elementary in Fayette County, W. Va. Space heaters have replaced a once functional basement coal furnace in the school.Doyle Maurer, Education Week's multimedia intern, describes his experience photographing facilities in Fayette County, West Virginia, for a recent story that detailed the area's predicament with outdated and decaying school infrastructure. A native of the state, Doyle describes returning to see schools in the area as eye-opening.

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    President Barack Obama talks with student Sofia Rios, of Arlington, Va., right, as he signs the "Every Student Succeeds Act," a major education law setting U.S. public schools on a new course of accountability, Thursday, Dec. 10, 2015, in Washington. The law will change the way teachers are evaluated and how the poorest performing schools are pushed to improve. Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., ranking member on the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee is at center. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)Associated Press staff photographer Evan Vucci gives a behind-the-scenes account of his assignment to photograph President Barack Obama signing the Every Student Succeeds Act into law.

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    Preschoolers Liezel, 4, left, and Ryan, 4, walk the hall at a prekindergarten center in the Windsor Terrace neighborhood in Brooklyn. To accommodate expanded enrollment, New York City places children in new pre-K centers, traditional schools, and community-based organizations. —Mark Abramson for Education Week
story: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/09/30/nyc-pushes-to-meet-promise-of-universal.html?qs=abramson+prekEducation Week's photo staff presents images that informed, delighted, or disturbed us throughout the past 12 months. These are our favorite photographs of 2015.

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    The end of the year is a great time to look back at the work we’ve done in 2015. Education Week’s multimedia staff sifted through the full array of videos for this YouTube playlist of those that proved most popular.

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    Chrissell Rhone (cq) casts a look at a student at the Picayune Center for Alternative Education on February 11, 2016 in Picayune, Mississippi after the student mentioned how many times he had been placed under house arrest. Rhone taught in New Orleans until he was displaced by Hurricane Katrina. Now he is the lone African American teacher at his workplace.Edmund Fountain photographs and interviews teacher Chrissell Rhone, the only African-American teacher at a school in Picayune, Miss.

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    In this photo taken on Tuesday, April  5, 2016, Natalya Vetrova, one year old, sleeps holding a bottle with fresh cow milk at home in Zalyshany, 53 km (32 miles) southwest of the destroyed reactor of the Chernobyl plant, Ukraine. Her village is in one of the sections of Ukraine contaminated by radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear explosion. (AP Photo/Mstyslav Chernov)Thirty years after the nuclear disaster at Chernobyl, children in surrounding villages of the Ukraine suffer from radiation illnesses and eat food tainted by the world's worst nuclear accident.

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    Assistant Principal Alexandra Escobar hugs second grader Analise Rivera, 8, during recess at R. H. Lee Elementary School in Chicago on Friday, May 6, 2016. 

The school, which is located in a predominantly Hispanic neighborhood, is losing Escobar who took a job in another school district.


Photo by Alyssa SchukarPhotographer Alyssa Schukar shares her favorite images and her experiences working on a recent story about the Chicago schools' funding crisis for Education Week.

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    GULFPORT, FLORIDA - MAY 26, 2016:  

Boca Ciega's valedictorian Da'Jhai Monroe, 17, is graduating with a 4.7 weighted GPA and going to Florida State University to study Biology and Public Policy. She was also accepted to Cornell University. "Overall I think I've gained a lot of confidence from being in high school, when I first came in I was kind of shy and introverted. And, I guess the more years I progressed, I started to understand my own potential." 

Boca Ciega High School's senior class is about 340 students with an addition 15-18 early graduates (students graduating a year early, at the end of their junior year). Approximately 75 percent of Boca Ciega's graduating seniors will be heading off to a college or university, with the remaining graduates geared toward the military, technical school or the work force. The 2014-2015 school year saw a 90 percent graduation rate for black students and a slightly lower graduation rate for white students -- at 87.79 percent. They have an annual event called "Let Them Eat Cake" to celebrate the seniors that are continuing their education. They have cake, a pep rally, play silly games, get to meet the other students heading to the same place they are, and get applauded by their peers as each individual student's future plans are announced. 

(Photo by Melissa Lyttle for Education Week)Photographer Melissa Lyttle documents an academic turnaround at Boca Ciega High School in St. Petersburg, Fla. “A friend who works at the school board in St. Petersburg, Fla., told me about an amazing turnaround at Boca Ciega High School (aka Bogie) in South St. Petersburg. This is a historically black, economically disadvantaged part of town, mired by segregation, […]

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    Students attend classes at Alliance Collins Family College-Ready High School, a free public charter school, on Monday, May 23, 2016 in Huntington Park, Calif. © 2016 Patrick T. Fallon/Special to Education WeekPhotographer Patrick Fallon writes about his experiences photographing a charter school in Los Angeles, and how it contrasts with the high school he attended.

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    in Cleveland during the Republican National Convention. 
--Swikar Patel/Education WeekA member of the Education Week team that is chronicling the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Associate Director of Photography Swikar Patel offers his unique view of the event.

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    A group of convention goers watches President Obama take the stage on the third night of the Democratic National Convention, July 23, at Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pa. --Deanna Del Ciello/Education WeekA member of the Education Week team covering this week's Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, multimedia producer Deanna Del Ciello offers her unique view of the event. This gallery will be updated throughout the convention proceedings.

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    CORRECTS YEAR TO 2012- The new Sandy Hook Elementary School hosts a media open house, Friday, July 29, 2016, in Newtown, Conn. The public is getting its first look at the school which will replace the one torn down after a gunman entered it in December 2012 and killed 20 first graders and six educators. The $50 million, 86,800-square-foot building opens next month. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)Education Week reporter Evie Blad and Associated Press photographer Mark Lennihan preview the new Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. The school replaces the one torn down after the 2012 shooting that left 26 people dead.

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    Noah, 17
I will remain an American. I love this country, what it is and what it was, but I’m honestly worried about the future.Amy Powell, a high school photography teacher in Ohio, asked her students how they felt about the presidential election during a time when they are not yet old enough to vote.

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    Bibi Aryoubi, 13, works on her English using a computer program in a class filled with refugee children at Cajon Valley Middle School in El Cajon, Calif. According to the U.S. State Department, nearly 80 percent of the more than 11,000 Syrian arrivals over the past year were children. Many of those children are enrolling in public schools around the country, including Chicago; Austin, Texas; New Haven, Connecticut; and El Cajon, which received 76 new Syrian students the first week of school.  –Christine Armario/APAccording to the U.S. State Department, nearly 60 percent of the more than 11,000 Syrian arrivals over the past year were children. Many of those children are enrolling in public schools around the country, including El Cajon, Calif., which received 76 new Syrian students the first week of school.

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    Trump_letters_01Three teachers at the Co-Op School, a private school in Brooklyn, N.Y., had each of their students write letters to the new president-elect, Donald Trump. Teacher Dahna Bozarth wrote about the exercise for Education Week. Photos by Bozarth, and her teacher colleagues, Allison Woodin and Emily Silver.

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